PRISMA Colloquium

Programm für das Wintersemester 2023/2024

Wednesdays, 13:00 Uhr s.t.

Institut für Physik
Lorentz-Raum, 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

25.10.23Prof. Dr. Jörg Jaeckel, Heidelberg Univ.
In this talk we start with the classical example of an oscillating cosmological field axion and axion-like particle dark matter. We will see that it is a suitable dark matter candidate, albeit one with interesting wave-like features that express themselves as coherent oscillations. We discuss existing and future probes of this type of dark matter. Following the theme of probing tiny oscillations we go beyond dark matter and even beyond particles and ask whether there could be a fundamental violation of Poincare invariance and study tests of this fundamental symmetry by looking for time-varying and oscillating effects.
13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum, 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

02.11.23Robert Svoboda, UC Davis, USA
The Far Detectors for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) are currently under construction at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), set to begin operations in about four years. While designed primarily to reconstruct GeV-scale neutrino interactions to look for CP violation, some unique properties of argon make solar and supernova burst neutrino measurements particularly interesting. I will discuss why this is so interesting, why an argon detection media is so unique, and what could be the limiting backgrounds. Link to Presentation Slides: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1rSApQOsGt0T87olMUTKhVMMJq0kXr0G9/edit?usp=sharing&ouid=103217522426961737580&rtpof=true&sd=true
13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum, 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Sonderseminar

08.11.23Prof. Dr. Marco Serone, SISSA, Italy
Perturbation theory is one of the most important analytical tool in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory, but it is known to give rise to divergent asymptotic series. How can we then make sense out of it? Resurgence seems to be a possible answer. After an historical detour on the study of the asymptotic behaviour of perturbation theory, we introduce basic notions of resurgence and show some application in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory.
Slides here...
13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum, 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

15.11.23Prof. Dr. Gianpaolo Carosi, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, USA
The axion is a hypothetical particle that may solve two problems in particle physics & cosmology, the Strong-CP problem (or why the neutron doesn’t have a measurable electric dipole moment) and the nature of dark matter. The Axion Dark Matter Experiment (ADMX), which started at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the mid-1990s and has gone through a series of upgrades through the years, is the DOE Flagship search for these particles. The experiment uses tunable resonant cavities in a large static magnetic field to enhance the conversion of dark matter axions to detectable microwaves. Quantum-limited amplifiers based on superconducting Josephson Junction circuits are critical to allow the search to be sensitive enough to rapidly scan the frequencies where the axion may exist. Here I will describe the detection strategy of ADMX, the progress made so far, and outline the next phase of the experiment dubbed ADMX-Extended Frequency Range (ADMX-EFR), which aims to cover 2-4 GHz at below DFSZ sensitivity. Opportunities for physics searches beyond axions, such as potentially high frequency gravity waves, will also be discussed.
Slides here...
13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum, 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

22.11.23Dr. Monica Dunford, Heidelberg Univ.
The dynamics of the Standard Model of particle physics play a central role in the properties of not only the microscopic world but also the biggest structures of our universe. The Higgs boson, for example, plays a critical part in how particles obtain their masses but also perhaps to dark matter and how our universe evolved. In this talk, the referent will focus on some key measurements that can be done with the on-going Run 3 data at the LHC and their impact on our understanding of particle physics. She will highlight how these results have connections beyond the microscopic world to dark matter, matter and anti-matter differences and beyond. In addition, she will touch upon future technology developments that will allow us to explore these connections even further.
13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum, 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

29.11.23Prof. Dr. Laura Lopez Honorez, Univ. Brussels, Belgium
Compelling data from Cosmology tell us that more than 80% of the matter content of the universe is made of Dark Matter (DM). Yet the fundamental properties of DM is still unknown. In my talk, I will assume that DM is a particle beyond the Standard Model of Particle physics. You usually hear that DM should be cold and not hot. Yet it can be warm. The referent will discuss under which condition "non-cold" dark matter can be a good candidate to account for all the DM. In this framework, she will briefly present different mechanisms for dark matter production. She will also show that, even when dark matter interacts very feebly with visible matter, the interplay between particle physics and cosmology experiments is a key in probing the dark matter nature.
Slides here...
13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum, 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

06.12.23Dr. Haakon Andresen, Univ. Stockholm, Sweden
The referent will give a broad overview of current core-collapse supernova theory and highlight important challenges for the future. Currently, numerical simulations produce successful explosion, but this is only the first required step in order to understand the role of core-collapse supernovae in the wider astrophysical and cosmological picture. He will discuss the underlying uncertainties in the input physics, such as neutrino transport and stellar evolution. The refernent will also summarize the current predictions for the gravitational waves and neutrino signals expected from core-collapse supernovae.
13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum, 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

13.12.23Prof. Dr. Elina Fuchs, Univ. Hannover
New Physics Searches in the Spectra of Atoms and Ions
13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum, 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

10.01.24Dr. Andrea Caputo, CERN, Switzerland
All the burning questions of the Standard Model such as the origin of dark matter, of the matter antimatter asymmetry, of neutrino masses, seem to invoke the presence of other, “dark” particles. But how do we look for these new particles? In this talk I advocate for the use of astrophysical objects as a laboratory to make progress on these puzzles. In particular, the referent will describe some ideas to use Supernovae and galaxy observations with line intensity mapping to shed some light on this darkness and probe motivated models such as axion-like particles, dark photons, light CP-even scalars. This effort is very timely, as it coincides with a broad set of astrophysical and cosmological observations becoming available now and in the near future.
13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum, 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

17.01.24Prof. Dr. Stephan Dolan, CERN, Switzerland
Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments have the potential to revolutionise our understanding of fundamental physics, offering an opportunity to characterise charge-parity violation in the lepton section, to determine the neutrino mass ordering and to explore the possibility of physics beyond three-flavour neutrino mixing. However, as more data is collected the current and next-generation of experiments will require increasingly precise control over the systematic uncertainties within their analyses. It is well known that some of the most challenging uncertainties to overcome stem from our uncertain modelling of neutrino-nucleus interactions, arising because measured event rates depend on the neutrino interaction cross section in addition to any oscillation probability. The sources of these uncertainties are often related to subtle details of the pertinent nuclear physics, such as the details of the target nucleus ground state, which are extremely difficult to control with sufficient precision. Confronting such uncertainties requires both state-of-art theoretical modelling and precise measurements of neutrino interaction event rates at experiment's near detectors, before oscillations occur. In this talk, we review the role of neutrino interaction systematic uncertainties in current and future measurements of neutrino oscillations as well as the experimental and theoretical prospects for reducing them to an acceptable level for the next generation of experiments.
13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum, 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

24.01.24Prof. Dr. Kai Schmitz, Univ. Münster
Pulsar Timing Array (PTA) collaborations around the globe recently announced compelling evidence for low-frequency gravitational waves permeating our entire Universe, that is, a gravitational-wave background (GWB) reaching us from all directions and at all times. This breakthrough achievement has important implications for astrophysics, as the GWB signal, if genuine, is likely to originate from a cosmic population of supermassive black holes orbiting each other at the centers of galaxies. As the referent will illustrate in this talk, the new PTA data is, however, also of great interest to the high-energy physics community, as it allows to probe a broad range of particle physics models of the early Universe that predict the generation of a cosmological GWB in the Big Bang. In this sense, the PTA data opens a new window onto the very early Universe and enables particle physicists to constrain scenarios of new physics beyond the Standard Model at extremely high energies. In his talk, the referent will give an overview of these searches for new physics at the PTA frontier and highlight several cosmological scenarios that underline the relevance of PTA observations for fundamental problems such as dark matter, neutrino masses, and the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. Finally, he will conclude with a brief outlook on future measurements that may help in discriminating between a GWB signal of astrophysical origin and a GWB signal from the Big Bang.
Slides here...
13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum, 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

31.01.24Noah Fleischer, LUB Mannheim
Mixed teams have greater collective knowledge, better ideas and fewer sick days. In short: more success. However, diverse teams also have different perspectives and are therefore more complex to manage. Professors often reach their limits with traditional management styles. This is because stereotypes relating to gender, age and social background persist and hinder equality. This leadership workshops deals with facts and figures on the topic of diversity & leadership in the university landscape - Anchoring diversity measures in daily university processes - Strategic leadership and teaching behavior using linguistic reframing techniques - Development of individually tailored measures for everyday life. Noah Fleischer combines his many years of experience in international management consulting in the corporate, political, and academic sectors with expertise as a university lecturer in advanced analytics and AI application development. He also advocates for the integration of diversity into the sustainability strategy and EU taxonomy. Noah Fleischer is also active as a mentor in the Friedrich Ebert Foundation and UN speaker on the topic of gender lens investing. All professors and group leaders are welcome. Please note that registration is required at prisma@uni-mainz.de until January, 10.
13:00 Uhr s.t., MITP seminar room, Staudingerweg 9, 02-430

07.02.24Prof. Dr. Martin Fertl, JGU Mainz, Institut für Physik, QUANTUM
Please see attachment
Slides here...
13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum, 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Koordination: Kontakt:

Prof. Dr. Tobias Hurth
Institut für Physik, THEP
hurth@uni-mainz.de

Victoria Durant
vdurant@uni-mainz.de