Jahresübersicht für das Jahr 2021

Übersicht 2020 - Übersicht 2021 - Übersicht 2022

07 Jan 2021

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., None

Prof. Dr. Antoine Browaeys, Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Palaiseau, France
This talk will present our effort to control and use the dipole-dipole interactions between cold atoms in order to implement spin Hamiltonians useful for quantum simulation of condensed matter or quantum optics situations. We trap individual atoms in arrays of optical tweezers separated by a few micrometers. We create almost arbitrary geometries of the atomic arrays in two and three dimensions up to about 200 atoms. To make the atoms interact, we either excite them to Rydberg states or induce optical dipoles with a near-resonance laser. Using this platform, we have in particular explored quantum magnetism, topological synthetic quantum matter, and a new light-matter interface.
at Zoom

11 Jan 2021

Seminar about Experimental Particle and Astroparticle Physics (ETAP)

Institut für Physik

12:30 Uhr s.t., usually Staudingerweg 7, Minkowskiraum

Bastian Schlag, Institut für Physik
Vertexing in ATLAS
at Zoom for now

12 Jan 2021

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Remote Seminar

16:15 Uhr s.t., None

Zheng-Tian Lu, University of Science and Technology of China
The long-lived noble-gas isotope 81Kr is the ideal tracer for water and ice with ages of 105 - 106 years, a range beyond the reach of 14C. 81Kr-dating, a concept pursued over the past five decades, is finally available to the earth science community at large. This is made possible by the development of the Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) method, in which individual atoms of the desired isotope are captured and detected. ATTA possesses superior selectivity, and is thus far used to analyze the environmental radioactive isotopes 81Kr, 85Kr, and 39Ar. These three isotopes have extremely low isotopic abundances in the range of 10-17 to 10-11, and cover a wide range of ages and applications. In collaboration with earth scientists, we are dating groundwater and mapping its flow in major aquifers around the world. We are also dating old ice from the deep ice cores of Antarctica, Greenland, and the Tibetan Plateau. For an update on this worldwide effort, please google “ATTA Primer”.
at Recording of the presentation

13 Jan 2021

PRISMA Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., None

Daniele Guffanti, Institute of Physics, JGU Mainz
The Sun, as all the other stars, is fueled for most of its life by the fusion of hydrogen into helium taking place in its core. Neutrinos produced in such reactions are the only direct probe to the innermost part of our star and real time messengers of its engine. Decades of experimental and phenomenological efforts allowed us to study in detail the driving energy production mechanism in the Sun, the proton-proton chain, which is responsible for ~99% of the Sun luminosity. The fusion processes accounting for the remaining 1% are believed to be catalyzed by the presence of Carbon, Nitrogen and Oxygen (CNO-cycle) in the Sun interior, but a direct evidence of the occurrence of such mechanism was still missing. After years-long efforts, the Borexino experiment at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories has recently reported the first direct observation of solar neutrinos produced in the CNO-cycle. In this talk I will present the Borexino findings and I will discuss the importance of CNO neutrinos for astrophysics and for our understanding of the Sun, particularly in connection to its chemical composition.
at Zoom

14 Jan 2021

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., None

Tanya S. Roussy, M.A., JILA (University of Colorado Boulder & NIST)
Over the past few decades, accelerators have been the traditional venue for new particle discoveries – but the paradigm is shifting. Accelerator energies are likely to remain on a plateau for some time, while atomic physics & precision measurement are in a remarkable period of progress. Some limits have advanced by a factor of 100 in less than 10 years, and laser technologies are being refined to exquisite levels. New Physics searches are already an established avenue in the atomic physics field; from atomic parity violation, to EDM searches, to equivalence principle tests. Happily, many of these platforms are well-suited to do double-duty as broadband dark matter searches. In this talk, I will explain the basics of our unique trapped-ion electron EDM search, how we used our recent data to constrain the gluon to axion-like particle coupling over seven mass decades, and how we solved some important methodological issues along the way.
at Zoom

Theoriekolloquium

Die Dozierenden der Theoretischen Physik

16:00 Uhr s.t., usually Newton-Raum, Staudinger Weg 9, 01-122

Dries Sels, New York University
Recent technological advances have put us at the brink of having access to small scale quantum computers capable of solving problems that cannot be tackled with classical computers. A limited number of algorithms have been proposed and their relevance to real world problems is a subject of active investigation. Solving problems relevant to chemistry are expected to be the first successful applications of quantum computers. In this talk, I will discuss a particular problem that can be solved efficiently on quantum computers: model inference for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. I will give a broad introduction to quantum computing and NMR metabolomics assuming no prior knowledge of the subject.
at Zoom

15 Jan 2021

GRK 2516 Soft Matter Seminar

Uni Mainz

10:30 Uhr s.t., via Zoom

Nathalie Katsonis, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
TBA

18 Jan 2021

Seminar about Experimental Particle and Astroparticle Physics (ETAP)

Institut für Physik

12:30 Uhr s.t., usually Staudingerweg 7, Minkowskiraum

Eftychia Tzovara, Institut für Physik
ttH(bb) in ATLAS: inclusive and differential cross section
at Zoom for now

19 Jan 2021

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Remote Seminar

16:15 Uhr s.t., None

Bernadett Weinzierl, University of Vienna, Austria
Aerosol particles are an important constituent of the global climate system. They not only affect the atmospheric radiation budget through scattering and absorption of solar radiation and through their role as cloud/ice nuclei but also impact air quality and human health. Both natural and human processes contribute to the global aerosol load. Whereas coarse‐mode aerosol (>1 μm diameter) mainly originates from natural aerosol sources, fine mode aerosol is frequently associated with human activities. Although substantial effort has been undertaken in the last decades to improve our knowledge about aerosols and their role in the global climate system, aerosol‐cloud‐radiation interactions still pose the largest uncertainty to estimates and interpretations of the Earth’s changing energy budget (IPCC, 2013). In order to decrease these uncertainties, research is necessary. Thereby, research aircraft like the German Aerospace Center (DLR) Falcon and the NASA DC‐8 provide unique platforms to study the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosols and their microphysical, chemical and optical properties. In this talk, I will introduce aerosols in general, and discuss their effects on the atmosphere and climate. Furthermore, I will show selected results from airborne field experiments with the DLR research aircraft Falcon and the NASA research aircraft DC8 studying the long‐range transport of mineral dust (SALTRACE project), the global distribution of coarse mode aerosols (ATom project), and aerosol mixtures in the Eastern Mediterranean (A‐LIFE project).
at Zoom

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

14:30 Uhr s.t., None

Danny van Dyk, TUM, Munich
I will discuss theory predictions for exclusive b->s ll decays within the SM and beyond, with emphasis on the hadronic matrix elements. There are two categories of these matrix elements: local form factors, and nonlocal contributions arising from e.g. four-quark operators. I will report the status and report recent progress from QCD-based methods on the non-local hadronic matrix elements arising from intermediate charm states. A particular focus will be a recent derivation of a dispersive bound on the non-local matrix element as discussed in arXiv:2011.09813.
at Zoom

20 Jan 2021

PRISMA Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., None

Jens Erler, JGU Mainz
The precise standard model
at Zoom

aktuell

21 Jan 2021

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., None

Prof. Dr. Hatice Altug, EPFL Lausanne, CH
New health initiatives with global healthcare, precision medicine and point-of-care diagnostics are demanding breakthrough developments in biosensing and bioanalytical tools. Current biosensors are lacking precision, bulky, and costly, as well as they require long detection times, sophisticated infrastructure and trained personnel, which limit their application areas. My laboratory is focused on to address these challenges by exploiting novel optical phenomena at nanoscale and engineering toolkits such as nanophotonics, nanofabrication, microfluidics and data science. In particular, we use photonic nanostructures based on plasmonics and dielectric metasurfaces that can confine light below the fundamental diffraction limit and generate strong electromagnetic fields in nanometric volumes. In this talk I will present how we exploit nanophotonics and combine it with imaging, biology, chemistry and data science techniques to achieve high performance biosensors. I will introduce ultra-sensitive Mid-IR biosensors based on surface enhanced infrared spectroscopy for chemical specific detection of molecules, large-area chemical imaging and real-time monitoring of protein conformations in aqueous environment. Next, I will describe our effort to develop ultra-compact, portable, rapid and low-cost microarrays and their use for early disease diagnostics in real-world settings. Finally, I will highlight label-free optofluidic biosensors that can perform one-of-a-kind measurements on live cells down to the single cell level, and provide their prospects in biomedical and clinical applications.
at Zoom

Seminar über Theorie der kondensierten Materie / TRR146 Seminar

K. Binder/ A. Nikoubashman / F. Schmid / G. Settanni / T. Speck / M. Sulpizi / P. Virnau

18:00 Uhr s.t., None

Scott Shell, UCSB, USA
tba
at Zoom

zukünftige Termine
25 Jan 2021

Seminar about Experimental Particle and Astroparticle Physics (ETAP)

Institut für Physik

12:30 Uhr s.t., usually Staudingerweg 7, Minkowskiraum

Florian Thomas, Institut für Physik
Accelerating Physics computations with GPUs
at Zoom for now

26 Jan 2021

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Remote Seminar

16:15 Uhr s.t., None

Viola Priseman, Max-Planck-Institution , Göttingen, Germany
Inferring the spread of SARS-CoV-2 and developing strategies to mitigate it
at Zoom

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

17:30 Uhr s.t., MITP seminar room

Zhengkang (Kevin) Zhang, Caltech
Matching a UV theory onto a low-energy EFT can be efficiently accomplished with functional methods. The functional approach is conceptually appealing: all calculations are performed within the UV theory at the matching scale, and no prior determination of an EFT operator basis is required. In this talk, I will present a simple prescription for functional matching up to one loop order, which accommodates any relativistic UV theory that contains generic interactions among scalar, fermion and vector fields. I will also introduce STrEAM (SuperTrace Evaluation Automated for Matching), a Mathematica package that helps streamline the procedure.
at Zoom

28 Jan 2021

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., None

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Tanja Mehlstäubler, Leibniz Universität Hannover
TBA
at Zoom

29 Jan 2021

GRK 2516 Soft Matter Seminar

Uni Mainz

10:30 Uhr s.t., via Zoom

Emanuela Zaccarelli, University of Rome
TBA

01 Feb 2021

Seminar about Experimental Particle and Astroparticle Physics (ETAP)

Institut für Physik

12:30 Uhr s.t., usually Staudingerweg 7, Minkowskiraum

Asma Hadef, Institut für Physik
Scintillator Material Development for Neutron Reconstruction in DUNE Experiment
at Zoom for now

02 Feb 2021

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Remote Seminar

16:15 Uhr s.t., None

Andy Brown, ECMWF, Reading, Great Britain
to be announced
at Zoom

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

14:30 Uhr s.t., None

Anders Eller Thomsen, University of Bern
TBA
at Zoom

04 Feb 2021

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., None

Prof. David Cassidy, University College London, UK
Positronium (Ps) is a hydrogenic atom composed of an electron bound to a positron. Since it contains only leptons Ps is, for all practical purposes, a pure QED system, unaffected by nuclear structure effects. Also, being composed of a particle-antiparticle pair, Ps atoms are metastable, and may decay via self-annihilation, as well as through the usual radiative decay channels seen in regular atoms. The energy levels of Ps can be calculated to arbitrary precision (in principle), and precision spectroscopy of Ps can therefore be used to perform rigorous tests of bound-state QED theory. Moreover, since the theoretical description is limited only by the order of the calculations performed, rather than unknown physical constants or incalculable terms, any observed (and confirmed) disagreement with theory could indicate the existence of “new physics” such as particles or fields not currently included in the Standard Model. In this talk I will describe some new measurements of the Ps n = 2 fine structure, specifically 2 ^3S_1--> 2 ^3P_J (J = 0,1,2) transitions. The experiments were performed using a radioactive isotope-based positron beam coupled to a buffer gas/Penning trap. This allows positron pulses to be generated, which are converted into a dilute Ps gas with in vacuum an initial number density on the order of 10^6 cm^-3. A pulsed dye laser was used to optically excite atoms to the 2 ^3S_1 level, and microwave radiation was used to drive transitions to the 2 ^3P_J levels, which decay radiatively to the ground state before annihilation. The different annihilation decay rates of the ground and excited (S) states allows the fine structure transitions to be monitored via the time spectrum of the Ps annihilation radiation. We found that the measured J = 1 and J = 2 lineshapes exhibited significant asymmetries, whereas a symmetric lineshape was observed for the J = 0 transition. The observed asymmetries are not consistent with the most obvious quantum interference or line-pulling phenomena arising from nearby (off-resonant) transitions, and in the absence of a complete lineshape model we are therefore unable to determine the fine structure intervals for these transtions. Since the J = 0 lineshape did not exhibit any significant asymmetry it was possible to extract a value for the centre frequency: however, the obtained interval was found to disagree with theory by 2.77 MHz, which amounts to 4.5 standard deviations. No mechanism for a line shift of this magnitude has so far been identified.
at Zoom

05 Feb 2021

Seminar über Theorie der kondensierten Materie / TRR146 Seminar

K. Binder/ A. Nikoubashman / F. Schmid / G. Settanni / T. Speck / M. Sulpizi / P. Virnau

10:30 Uhr s.t., None

Lukas Stelzl, Institute of Physics, JGU Mainz
Multi-scale simulations of disordered proteins and their assemblies
at Zoom

08 Feb 2021

Seminar about Experimental Particle and Astroparticle Physics (ETAP)

Institut für Physik

Sonderseminar: 12:30 Uhr s.t., usually Staudingerweg 7, Minkowskiraum

Thomas Honig, Institut für Physik
Cross section measurement in the WH trilepton final state in ATLAS
at Zoom for now

Sonderseminar

09 Feb 2021

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Remote Seminar

16:15 Uhr s.t., None

Michael Feindt, University of Karlsruhe
From Artificial Intelligence in particle physics towards the autonomous supply chain for global enterprises: The Blue Yonder story
at Zoom

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

14:30 Uhr s.t., MITP seminar room

Riccardo Barbieri, SNS Pisa
Motivated by the hierarchy problem and by the pattern of quark masses and mixings, I describe a picture of flavour physics that should give rise in a not too distant future to observable deviations from the SM in Higgs compositeness and/or in B-decays (if LFV confirmed) or perhaps even in supersymmetry, depending on the specific realization.
at Zoom

10 Feb 2021

PRISMA Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., None

Nicola Neri, Università di Milano
Magnetic and electric dipole moments of fundamental particles provide powerful probes for physics within and beyond the Standard Model. For the case of short-lived particles these have not been experimentally accessible to date due to the difficulties imposed by their short lifetimes. A unique program of direct measurements of electromagnetic dipole moments of strange and charm baryons, and ultimately beauty baryons and the tau lepton, at the LHC is proposed. Novel experimental techniques have been developed, along with feasibility studies and projected sensitivities for different luminosity scenarios.
at Zoom

11 Feb 2021

Theoriekolloquium

Die Dozierenden der Theoretischen Physik

16:00 Uhr s.t., usually Newton-Raum, Staudinger Weg 9, 01-122

Ehud Altman, UC Berkeley
TBA
at Zoom

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., None

Dr. Stefan Ulmer, Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg
The Standard Model of particle physics is both incredibly successful and glaringly incomplete. Among the questions left open is the striking imbalance of matter and antimatter in our universe, which inspires experiments to compare the fundamental properties of matter/antimatter conjugates with high precision. The BASE collaboration at the antiproton decelerator of CERN is performing such high-precision comparisons with protons and antiprotons. Using advanced, ultra-stable, cryogenic particle traps and superconducting detectors with single particle sensitivity, we have performed the most precise measurement of the proton-to-antiproton charge-to-mass ratio with a fractional uncertainty of 69 parts per trillion [1]. In another measurement, we have invented a novel spectroscopy method, which allowed for the first ultra-high precision measurement of the antiproton magnetic moment with a fractional precision of 1.5 parts in a billion [2]. Together with our recent measurement of the proton magnetic moment [3] this improves the precision of previous experiments [4] by more than a factor of 3000. A time series analysis of this recent magnetic moment measurement furthermore enabled us to set first direct constraints on the interaction of antiprotons with axion-like particles (ALPs) [5], and most recently, we have used our ultra-sensitive single particle detection systems to derive narrow-band constraints on the conversion of ALPs into photons [6]. In my talk I will review the recent achievements of BASE and will outline strategies to further improve our high-precision studies of matter-antimatter symmetry. This outlook will involve the implementation of sympathetic cooling of antiprotons using quantum logic methods, the development of the transportable antiproton trap BASE-STEP, and will also review recent experimental progress towards 10-fold improved measurements of the antiproton properties. [1] S. Ulmer et al., Nature 524, 196 (2015). [2] C. Smorra et al., Nature 550, 371 (2017). [3] G. Schneider et al., Science 358, 1081 (2017). [4] J. DiSciacca et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 130801 (2013). [5] C. Smorra et al., Nature 575, 310 (2019). [6] J. A. Devlin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., accepted (2021). S. Ulmer1, K. Blaum2, M. Bohman1,2, M. Borchert1,3, J. A. Devlin1,4, S. Erlewein1,2,4, M. Fleck1,5, C. Smorra1, M. Wiesinger1,2, C. Will2, E. Wursten5, Y. Matsuda6, C. Ospelkaus3, W. Quint6, J. Walz7,8, Y. Yamazaki1 1RIKEN, Ulmer Fundamental Symmetries Laboratory, Saitama, Japan; 2Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg, Germany; 3Leibnitz University, Hannover, Germany; 4CERN, Geneva, Switzerland; 5The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 6GSI - Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt, Germany; 7Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz, Germany; 8Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, Germany;
at Zoom

12 Feb 2021

GRK 2516 Soft Matter Seminar

Uni Mainz

10:30 Uhr s.t., via Zoom

Jens-Uwe Sommer, Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research, Dresden
TBA

16 Feb 2021

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

14:30 Uhr s.t., MITP seminar room

Nick Evans, Southampton U.
TBA
at Zoom

19 Feb 2021

Seminar über Theorie der kondensierten Materie / TRR146 Seminar

K. Binder/ A. Nikoubashman / F. Schmid / G. Settanni / T. Speck / M. Sulpizi / P. Virnau

10:30 Uhr s.t., None

Adam Sieradzan, University of Gdańsk, Poland
tba
at Zoom

26 Feb 2021

Seminar über Theorie der kondensierten Materie / TRR146 Seminar

K. Binder/ A. Nikoubashman / F. Schmid / G. Settanni / T. Speck / M. Sulpizi / P. Virnau

18:00 Uhr s.t., None

Marina Guenza, Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oregon, USA
TBA
at zoom

13 Apr 2021

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

14:30 Uhr s.t., MITP seminar room

Raffaele Tito D'Agnolo, IPhT Saclay
TBA
at Zoom