Jahresübersicht für das Jahr 2024

Übersicht 2023 - Übersicht 2024 - Übersicht 2025

09 Jan 2024

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik

16:15 Uhr s.t., HS KPH

Prof. Dr. Markus Roth, TU Darmstadt
With the recent demonstration of fusion ignition and burn and the first energy gain from controlled fusion reactions, the laser-based fusion approach has become a promising concept for fusion energy. While not supported in Germany until a few years ago, Germany has a huge potential in taking the lead on laser-fusion research, based on its excellent science and technology in optics and lasers. Focused Energy is a US/German Startup company, spin-off of the TU Darmstadt that has gathered the world experts in laser fusion in the last two years. I will review the recent results at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory National Ignition Facility and sketch a pathway from this groundbreaking result to a first fusion reactor prototype.
Slides here...

Seminar Festkörper- und Grenzflächenphysik KOMET - experimentell

Institut für Physik

12:00 Uhr s.t., Newton-Raum, Staudingerweg 9, 1. Stock, Raum 122 (Nebengebäude)

TBA, TBA
TBA

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

14:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz room (Staudingerweg 7, 5th floor)

Zeno Capatti, U. Bern
In this talk, I will review the main aspects of three-dimensional approaches to the computation of Feynman diagrams and of the Local Unitarity formalism. I will start by discussing the Cross-Free Family representation, which allows for a systematic analysis of the singularities of Feynman diagrams. I will then introduce the Local Unitarity framework, in which interference diagrams are combined, through a generally-applicable mapping of the phase-space measure, to give locally finite cross-sections. Finally, I will discuss the extension of the Local Unitarity formalism to processes with initial state singularities, which will allow me to discuss the role of spectator particles and higher-multiplicity initial-state partonic configurations in the cancellation and factorisation of singularities.

10 Jan 2024

PRISMA+ Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum, 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Dr. Andrea Caputo, CERN, Switzerland
All the burning questions of the Standard Model such as the origin of dark matter, of the matter antimatter asymmetry, of neutrino masses, seem to invoke the presence of other, “dark” particles. But how do we look for these new particles? In this talk I advocate for the use of astrophysical objects as a laboratory to make progress on these puzzles. In particular, the referent will describe some ideas to use Supernovae and galaxy observations with line intensity mapping to shed some light on this darkness and probe motivated models such as axion-like particles, dark photons, light CP-even scalars. This effort is very timely, as it coincides with a broad set of astrophysical and cosmological observations becoming available now and in the near future.

11 Jan 2024

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14:00 Uhr s.t., IPH Lorentzraum 05-127

Prof. Dr. Stefan Eriksson, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Swansea University, UK
Precision measurements of the properties of trapped antihydrogen offer stringent tests of fundamental principles underlying particle physics and general relativity, such as Lorentz and CPT invariance and the Einstein Equivalence Principle. In this presentation I will give an overview of the ALPHA antihydrogen experiment at CERN including recent results from spectroscopy and observations of the effect of gravity. I will review how results are interpreted as tests of fundamental physics with a discussion of how a hypothetical CPT violation could result in matter-antimatter asymmetry. I will give an outline of the prospects for future high-precision spectroscopy, free-fall and gravitational redshift experiments with antihydrogen.

15 Jan 2024

Seminar about Experimental Particle and Astroparticle Physics (ETAP)

Institut für Physik

12:30 Uhr s.t., Staudingerweg 7, Minkowskiraum

Johann Martyn, Institut für Physik
Deployment of Water-based Liquid Scintillator in ANNIE
at https://indico.him.uni-mainz.de/event/199/

16 Jan 2024

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik

16:15 Uhr s.t., HS KPH

Prof. Marco Durante, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH
Particle therapy is a rapidly growing and potentially the most effective and precise radiotherapy technique. However, only a tiny minority of patients receive protons or heavy ions rather than X-rays these days. Physics research is needed to address a few problems that hamper its wider diffusion. The efforts are toward making particle therapy cheaper, faster, and more conformal. In this lecture we will give some examples of applications of nuclear physics to particle therapy. In particular, for reducing range uncertainty we will discuss the use of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) for simultaneous treatment and online range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) within the ERC AdG BARB (Biomedical Applications of Radioactive ion Beams) project at GSI/FAIR. We will also report on recent experiments in collaboration with Helmholtz Institute Mainz.
Slides here...

Seminar Festkörper- und Grenzflächenphysik KOMET - experimentell

Institut für Physik

12:00 Uhr s.t., Newton-Raum, Staudingerweg 9, 1. Stock, Raum 122 (Nebengebäude)

TBA, TBA
TBA

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

14:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz room (Staudingerweg 7, 5th floor)

Álvaro Pastor Gutiérrez, MPIK Heidelberg
While the Standard Model of particle physics has been extremely successful in predicting experimental results, it still leaves us with unanswered questions about dark matter, the imbalance between matter and antimatter, and the emergence of fundamental scales. In this talk, I will outline our initial efforts to explore strong new physics scenarios using the non-perturbative functional renormalisation group. I will begin by introducing the flow equation and applying it to the Standard Model, thereby uncovering previously uncharted high-energy phases in the Higgs potential. The second part of the talk will focus on a comprehensive study of (quasi-)conformal “Technicolour” theories, aiming to identify Higgs-like bound states and detectable dark sectors. To achieve this, we will employ bosonisation techniques, which provide valuable insights into the properties of dynamically emergent bound states. I will conclude with a specific case study addressing the flavour puzzle within the framework of fundamental partial compositeness.

17 Jan 2024

PRISMA+ Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum, 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Prof. Dr. Stephan Dolan, CERN, Switzerland
Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments have the potential to revolutionise our understanding of fundamental physics, offering an opportunity to characterise charge-parity violation in the lepton section, to determine the neutrino mass ordering and to explore the possibility of physics beyond three-flavour neutrino mixing. However, as more data is collected the current and next-generation of experiments will require increasingly precise control over the systematic uncertainties within their analyses. It is well known that some of the most challenging uncertainties to overcome stem from our uncertain modelling of neutrino-nucleus interactions, arising because measured event rates depend on the neutrino interaction cross section in addition to any oscillation probability. The sources of these uncertainties are often related to subtle details of the pertinent nuclear physics, such as the details of the target nucleus ground state, which are extremely difficult to control with sufficient precision. Confronting such uncertainties requires both state-of-art theoretical modelling and precise measurements of neutrino interaction event rates at experiment's near detectors, before oscillations occur. In this talk, we review the role of neutrino interaction systematic uncertainties in current and future measurements of neutrino oscillations as well as the experimental and theoretical prospects for reducing them to an acceptable level for the next generation of experiments.

18 Jan 2024

GRK 2516 Soft Matter Seminar

Uni Mainz

14:30 Uhr s.t., Minkowski Room, 05-119, Staudingerweg 7

Sofia Kantorovich, Computational Physics, University of Vienna
TBA
at Zoom

Seminar über Theorie der kondensierten Materie / TRR146 Seminar

F. Schmid / G. Settanni / P. Virnau / L. Stelzl

14:30 Uhr s.t., Minkowski Room, 05-119, Staudingerweg 7

Sofia Kantorovich, Computational Physics, University of Vienna
GRK 2516 Soft Matter Seminar

23 Jan 2024

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik

16:15 Uhr s.t., HS KPH

CANCELED: Prof. Jonathan Wurtele, University of Berkeley, California
This talk has been canceled due to illness! The ALPHA Collaboration at CERN synthesizes, traps, and investigates the properties of antihydrogen, the antimatter equivalent of hydrogen. ALPHA’s research has the goal of testing the standard model which holds that antihydrogen and hydrogen have the same spectrum, and the prediction of general relativity that antihydrogen atoms experience the same gravitational force as hydrogen atoms do. ALPHA’s experiments conducted over the last decade produced measurements of the 1S-2S line, hyperfine structure, Lyman-alpha transition, and charge neutrality of antihydrogen. This presentation will predominantly delve into our latest breakthrough. Utilizing an innovative magnet system, we have successfully observed, for the first time, the interaction of neutral antimatter with the Earth’s gravitational field. The best fit to our measurements yields a value of (0.75 ± 0.13 (stat. + syst.) ± 0.16 (simulation)) g for the local acceleration of antimatter towards the Earth, consistent with the predictions of general relativity. We rule out the possibility of antihydrogen experiencing an upwards acceleration g in the Earth’s gravity. Finally, potential paths to higher-precision gravity experiments will be discussed.

Seminar Festkörper- und Grenzflächenphysik KOMET - experimentell

Institut für Physik

12:00 Uhr s.t., Newton-Raum, Staudingerweg 9, 1. Stock, Raum 122 (Nebengebäude)

TBA, TBA
TBA

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

14:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz room (Staudingerweg 7, 5th floor)

Daniel Schmitt, Frankfurt U.
Theories beyond the Standard Model (BSM) with classical scale invariance predict an intriguing thermal history of the early Universe. Due to the absence of dimensionful terms at tree level in these models, the electroweak phase transition (EWPT) can be significantly delayed, inducing a period of thermal inflation supercooling the Universe. The exit from this supercooled state can then be triggered via different mechanisms, depending on the model parameter space. In the first part of my talk, I will discuss the end of supercooling via a strong, first-order QCD chiral phase transition. I will outline how the associated gravitational wave (GW) production can be studied within effective QCD theories, with a particular focus on the effect of thermal inflation on the strongly coupled dynamics. In the second part, I will present an additional option to realize the exit from supercooling: a tachyonic phase transition. Here, the SM quark condensates source an exponential amplification of BSM scalar fields, generating a unique GW background detectable by future observatories.

24 Jan 2024

PRISMA+ Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum, 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Prof. Dr. Kai Schmitz, Univ. Münster
Pulsar Timing Array (PTA) collaborations around the globe recently announced compelling evidence for low-frequency gravitational waves permeating our entire Universe, that is, a gravitational-wave background (GWB) reaching us from all directions and at all times. This breakthrough achievement has important implications for astrophysics, as the GWB signal, if genuine, is likely to originate from a cosmic population of supermassive black holes orbiting each other at the centers of galaxies. As the referent will illustrate in this talk, the new PTA data is, however, also of great interest to the high-energy physics community, as it allows to probe a broad range of particle physics models of the early Universe that predict the generation of a cosmological GWB in the Big Bang. In this sense, the PTA data opens a new window onto the very early Universe and enables particle physicists to constrain scenarios of new physics beyond the Standard Model at extremely high energies. In his talk, the referent will give an overview of these searches for new physics at the PTA frontier and highlight several cosmological scenarios that underline the relevance of PTA observations for fundamental problems such as dark matter, neutrino masses, and the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. Finally, he will conclude with a brief outlook on future measurements that may help in discriminating between a GWB signal of astrophysical origin and a GWB signal from the Big Bang.
Slides here...

25 Jan 2024

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14:00 Uhr s.t., IPH Lorentzraum 05-127

Dr. Aleksandra Zoilkowska, JGU NEUQUAM Research Group
Cold atom experiments offer a distinctive platform for the investigation of many-body quantum physics, especially in non-equilibrium scenarios. The complexity inherent in these experiments often poses challenges to conventional theoretical methods. Nevertheless, exact analytical solutions become feasible when the underlying theory is integrable. Integrability plays a pivotal role in constraining the dynamics of many-body systems, enabling the derivation of, for instance, precise time-dependent density and velocity profiles after inhomogeneous quenches. This unique characteristic establishes a direct correspondence between theoretical predictions and experimental outcomes. In this talk, I will delve into the essence of quantum integrability and its efficacy in non-equilibrium many-body calculations, utilizing the framework of Generalized Hydrodynamics. An examination of the Lieb-Liniger Hamiltonian will exemplify how integrability has been applied in cold atom setups, resulting in the experimental realization of Quantum Newton's Cradle. Furthermore, I will draw upon my own research to provide insights into other quantum ''beasts'' emerging in out-of-equilibrium physics, rooted in an integrable theory known as the Homogeneous Sine-Gordon Model.

26 Jan 2024

Seminar über Theorie der kondensierten Materie / TRR146 Seminar

F. Schmid / G. Settanni / P. Virnau / L. Stelzl

10:15 Uhr s.t., Lorentz Room, 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Scott Milner, Penn State University
Using simulations to predict miscibility

29 Jan 2024

Seminar about Experimental Particle and Astroparticle Physics (ETAP)

Institut für Physik

12:30 Uhr s.t., Staudingerweg 7, Minkowskiraum

Anamika Aggarwal, Institut für Physik
Phase-I Upgrade of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger
at https://indico.him.uni-mainz.de/event/199/

30 Jan 2024

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik

16:15 Uhr s.t., HS KPH

Prof. Silvia Masciocchi, Heidelberg/GSI
Very high energy densities are reached in ultra-relativistic collisions of heavy ions. Under these conditions, the confinement in strongly-interacting matter is lifted, and a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is formed. At the highest temperatures realized in the laboratory, this system offers us the opportunity to study QCD matter under extreme conditions. The successful heavy-ion program at the LHC provides data of increasing precision. I will illustrate how experimental evidence supports the description of the QGP by fluid dynamics. This has been recently extended to include even rare and penetrating probes such as heavy quarks. Through this description and making use of neural networks and Bayesian inference, we are able to determine fundamental properties of QCD with increasing precision. A quick look into the formidable detectors with which we gain this evidence in the ALICE will complete the overview.
Slides here...

Seminar Festkörper- und Grenzflächenphysik KOMET - experimentell

Institut für Physik

12:00 Uhr s.t., Newton-Raum, Staudingerweg 9, 1. Stock, Raum 122 (Nebengebäude)

TBA, TBA
TBA

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

14:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz room (Staudingerweg 7, 5th floor)

Maria Ramos, IFT Madrid
Singlet scalars, namely axion-like particles (ALPs), are among the most promising candidates of new physics. Standard (minimal) assumptions in the study of these particles might however hide a large landscape of solutions to different puzzles in the Standard Model, which can limit our discovery potential. In the first part of the talk, I will consider the impact of scalar mixing in the standard axion mechanism to solve the strong CP problem. I will show that the canonical axion mass-scale relation can be modified within QCD and multiple signals may be required to reconstruct the full solution to the strong CP problem, constrained by a precise sum rule. In the second part of the talk, I will discuss the impact of operator mixing, via RGEs, in the ALP parameter space. I will specially focus on shift-breaking and CP violating effects, and I will discuss some phenomenological applications.

31 Jan 2024

PRISMA+ Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., MITP seminar room, Staudingerweg 9, 02-430

Noah Fleischer, LUB Mannheim
Mixed teams have greater collective knowledge, better ideas and fewer sick days. In short: more success. However, diverse teams also have different perspectives and are therefore more complex to manage. Professors often reach their limits with traditional management styles. This is because stereotypes relating to gender, age and social background persist and hinder equality. This leadership workshops deals with facts and figures on the topic of diversity & leadership in the university landscape - Anchoring diversity measures in daily university processes - Strategic leadership and teaching behavior using linguistic reframing techniques - Development of individually tailored measures for everyday life. Noah Fleischer combines his many years of experience in international management consulting in the corporate, political, and academic sectors with expertise as a university lecturer in advanced analytics and AI application development. He also advocates for the integration of diversity into the sustainability strategy and EU taxonomy. Noah Fleischer is also active as a mentor in the Friedrich Ebert Foundation and UN speaker on the topic of gender lens investing. All professors and group leaders are welcome. Please note that registration is required at prisma@uni-mainz.de until January, 10.

01 Feb 2024

GRK 2516 Soft Matter Seminar

Uni Mainz

17:00 Uhr s.t., TU Darmstad (Room, TBA)

Günter Auernhammer, Leibniz Institute for Polymer Research, Dresden
TBA
at Zoom

Seminar über Theorie der kondensierten Materie / TRR146 Seminar

F. Schmid / G. Settanni / P. Virnau / L. Stelzl

14:30 Uhr s.t., Minkowski Room, 05-119, Staudingerweg 7

Günter Auernhammer, Leibniz Institute for Polymer Research, Dresden
GRK 2516 Soft Matter Seminar

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14:00 Uhr s.t., IPH Lorentzraum 05-127

Prof. Piet van Duppen, KU Leuven, Belgien
The thorium-229 nucleus contains an isomeric state with a low excitation energy, making it possible to probe using lasers. It is one of the best candidates for the development of a nuclear clock [1,2] which will enable the ability to test fundamental principles in physics (see e.g. [4]). However, to accomplish such a nuclear clock, the nuclear properties of the isomer need to be determined more precisely and two approaches are being followed. VUV spectroscopy revealed the radiative decay of the thorium-229 isomer in a study at ISOLDE-CERN by populating the isomer via the beta decay of actinium-229, implanting the beam in large bandgap crystals (CaF2 and MgF2). A reduced uncertainty of the isomer’s excitation energy (8.338±0.024 eV) and a first determination of the half-life (670±102 s) in MgF2 was reported [5]. During a follow-up campaign, different crystals were tested, the energy was determined with a better precision and the half-life behaviour of the VUV signal in the different crystals was studied. Preparatory work to perform laser ionization spectroscopy of the thorium-229 ground and isomeric states, populated in the alpha decay of uranium-233, is performed in an argon gas-jet based system. These studies, aimed to deduce the mean-square charge radii and moments of both ground and isomeric state, are based on singly charged thorium ions and necessitates a search for efficient and effective laser ionization schemes of thorium giving rise to a more precise determination of the first and second ionization potential. Results from these off and on-line studies will be presented and outlook to future work discussed. [1] E. Peik and C. Tamm, EPL 61, 181 (2003). [2] C. Campbell et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 120802 (2012). [3] L. von der Wense et al. Nature 533 (7601), 47–51 (2016). [4] E. Peik et al., Quantum Sci. Technol. 6, 034002 (2021). [5] Kraemer et al., Nature 617, 706–710 (2023).

Seminar über die Physik der kondensierten Materie (SFB/TRR173 Spin+X und SFB/TR288 Kolloquium, TopDyn-Seminar)

JGU

14:00 Uhr s.t., 01 122 Newton-Raum

Huaiyang YUAN, TU Delft and Zhejiang University
There is a rising interest in integrating magnetic systems with known quantum platforms for multi-functional quantum information processing. The coupling among magnons, photons, phonons, and qubits has already been proposed and demonstrated in the experiments. In this talk, I will introduce our recent results on the interplay of magnons and surface plasmons in two-dimensional systems. Our findings may open a novel route to integrate plasmonic and spintronic devices and bridge the fields of low-dimensional physics, plasmonics, and spintronics.

06 Feb 2024

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik

16:15 Uhr s.t., HS KPH

Prof. J.C. Seamus Davis, University of Oxford
Everything around us, everything each of us has ever experienced, and virtually everything underpinning our technological society and economy is governed by quantum mechanics. Yet this most fundamental physical theory of nature often feels as if it is a set of somewhat eerie and counterintuitive ideas of no direct relevance to our lives. Why is this? One reason is that we cannot perceive the strangeness (and astonishing beauty) of the quantum mechanical phenomena all around us by using our own senses. I will describe the history of development of techniques that allow us to visualize electronic quantum phenomena and new states of quantum matter directly at the atomic scale. As recent examples, we will visually explore the previously unseen and very beautiful forms of quantum matter making up electronic liquid crystals[1,2], high temperature superconductors[2,3,4] and electron-pair crystals[5,6,7,8]. I will discuss the implications for fundamental physics research and also for advanced materials and new technologies, arising from quantum matter visualization. References: 1. Science 344, 612 (2014) 2. Nature 570, 484 (2019) 3. Science 357, 75 (2017) 4. Science 364, 976 (2019) 5. Nature 571, 234 (2020) 6. Nature 532, 343 (2016) 7. Science 372, 1447 (2021) 8. Nature 618, 921 (2023)
Slides here...

Seminar Festkörper- und Grenzflächenphysik KOMET - experimentell

Institut für Physik

12:00 Uhr s.t., Newton-Raum, Staudingerweg 9, 1. Stock, Raum 122 (Nebengebäude)

TBA, TBA
TBA

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

14:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz room (Staudingerweg 7, 5th floor)

Filippo Sala, U. Bologna
I will show how first order phase transitions (PT) in the early universe, with relativistic bubble walls, constitute particle accelerators and colliders via the dense shell of particles that they necessarily accumulate. These `bubbletrons' offer novel opportunities of observational access to very high energy scales, in addition to the gravitational waves from the PT. As three examples, I will discuss: i) non-adiabatic production of ZeV dark matter which is hot enough to leave an imprint in the matter power spectrum; ii) production of relics beyond the GUT scale without the need for the universe to ever reach those temperatures; iii) realization of testable baryogenesis and leptogenesis down to the TeV scale. In passing I will mention open questions about the physics of particle shells at bubble walls, and their potential far-reaching implications.

07 Feb 2024

PRISMA+ Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum, 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Prof. Dr. Martin Fertl, JGU Mainz, Institut für Physik, QUANTUM
Please see attachment
Slides here...

08 Feb 2024

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14:00 Uhr s.t., IPH Lorentzraum 05-127

Prof. J.C. Séamus Davis, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
Although UTe2 appears to be the first 3D spin-triplet topological superconductor, its superconductive order-parameter Δ_k has not yet been established. If spin-triplet, it should have odd parity so that Δ_(-k)=-Δ_k and, in addition, may break time-reversal symmetry. A distinctive identifier of 3D spin-triplet topological superconductors is the appearance of an Andreev bound state (ABS) on all surfaces parallel to a nodal axis, due to the presence of a topological surface band (TSB). Moreover, theory shows that specific ABS characteristics observable in tunneling to an s-wave superconductor distinguish between chiral and non-chiral Δ_k. To search for such phenomena in UTe2 we employ s-wave superconductive scan-tip imaging of UTe2 [1] to discover a powerful zero-energy ABS signature at the (0-11) crystal termination [2]. Its imaging yields quasiparticle scattering interference signatures of two Δ_k nodes aligned with the crystal a-axis. Most critically, development of the zero-energy Andreev conductance peak into two finite-energy particle-hole symmetric conductance maxima as the tunnel barrier is reduced, signifies that UTe2 superconductivity is non-chiral. Overall, the discovery of a TSB, of its a zero-energy ABS, of internodal scattering along the a-axis, and of splitting the zero-energy Andreev conductance maximum due to s-wave proximity, categorizes the superconductive Δ_k as the odd-parity non-chiral B3u state [2], which is equivalent to the planar state of superfluid 3He. [1] Nature 618, 921 (2023) [3] Gu, Wang, et al. Science (2023)

zukünftige Termine
18 Apr 2024

Seminar über Theorie der kondensierten Materie / TRR146 Seminar

F. Schmid / G. Settanni / P. Virnau / L. Stelzl

14:30 Uhr s.t., Minkowski-Raum, 05-119, Staudingerweg 7

Felix Höfling, Freie Universität Berlin
Emergent phenomena in flowing matter

16 May 2024

Seminar über Theorie der kondensierten Materie / TRR146 Seminar

F. Schmid / G. Settanni / P. Virnau / L. Stelzl

14:30 Uhr s.t., Minkowski-Raum, 05-119, Staudingerweg 7

Sonya Hansen, Flatiron Institute
TBA

13 Jun 2024

Seminar über Theorie der kondensierten Materie / TRR146 Seminar

F. Schmid / G. Settanni / P. Virnau / L. Stelzl

14:30 Uhr s.t., Minkowski-Raum, 05-119, Staudingerweg 7

Dr. Narendra Kumar, BionTech
Industry Talk on BionTech